Amazement overwhelmed the princess the next morning when she saw on King Vikrama the limbs he had lost seven and a half years before. Seeing her stunned, Vikrama disclosed to her his identity and told her the whole story, hearing which she became exceedingly delighted. She then told the whole story to her companions, who hurried to tell the king and queen.
King Chandrasena meanwhile had arisen from his bed after the vivid dream which had wakened him, and rushing to his daughter’s palace he saw King Vikrama, as gorgeous as the god of love himself, sitting there. When King Chandrasena asked, “Who are you?” Vikramaditya replied, “I am that thief who stole the merchant’s necklace.”
Chandrasena said, “So I see. But your feet and hands were chopped off at my order, and I see that you now have both your feet and your hands back again. Please explain this mystery to me, that my confusion may be dispelled and my doubt disappear.”
“I am called The Heroic Vikramaditya,” began King Vikrama, “and I am king of the city of Ujjayini.” He thereupon related the entire story of his Seven-and-a-Halfto King Chandrasena, who fell at his feet begging forgiveness for himself for having so cruelly mistreated such a great king. But Vikramaditya told him, “The only offense that has been commked here is the offense commited to my destiny. The planet Saturn’s impatience possessed my body for a full seven and a half years, and it was because I had insulted Saturn that I was in such a sorry plight. What did you have to do with any of that? You acted only to fulfill the destiny that Saturn had mapped out for me.”
Then King Chandrasena offered his daughter’s hand in marriage to Vikramaditya and sent for the merchant who had accused that hero of stealing the necklace. Hearing the summons, the merchant came to the court posthaste and asked King Chandrasena, “What is your command, your majesty?”
King Chandrasena asked, “Have you recovered your necklace?”
The merchant replied, “Yes, great King! A painted swan had swallowed it, and when later the swan brought it back up I was wonderstruck.”
King Chandrasena said, “0 merchant! All this was an illusion created by Lord Saturn. Taken in by by this illusion, you accused of stealing it the stranger who was your guest. Your guest has now arrived here. Do you recognize him? He is Ujjayini’s valorous King Vikramaditya, who had been brought to that pass due to Saturn’s ire.”
The merchants eyes became round like saucers when he saw King Vikrama there in the palace, whole again. Falling prostrate and clasping Vikramaditya’s feet piteously, he babbled requests for mercy for having laid a false charge of theft, and requested any punishment in return. But King Vikrama told him, “0 merchant! This was not your fault. Lord Saturn, who was angry with me, caused all these events to occur.” On hearing this, the merchant offered King Vikrama his own daughter’s hand in marriage with an immense mound of gold coins as dowry.
Now the king sent his messenger to call the oil merchant, who came hastily to the court and, folding his hands respectfully, asked, “0 King! What is your command?”
King Chandrasena said to him, “Do you recognize who is sitting here?”
Now, Vikramaditya’s body shone dazzlingly like the Sun, and his luster was so incomparable that the oil trader could not properly recognize him. Then the king said, “This is the man who drove the oxen at the oil press in your home. Now do you recognize him?”
The oilman said, “He resembles him strongly in the face, but how can I be sure?”
King Chandrasena now told the oil presser the whole truth and said, “This is the Heroic Vikramaditya. In consideration for your attentive hospitality to him, I award one village to you and your descendant;.” Hearing this, the oilman was mightily pleased.